Month of the Military Child: To be a military child

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.--  Erin Ford (right) stands with her parents, Chief Master Sgts. Christopher and Patricia Ford, following a ceremony in 2016. April is designated the month of the Military Child to highlight the daily sacrifices they make while their loved ones are serving. (Photo courtesy the Ford family)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.-- Erin Ford (right) stands with her parents, Chief Master Sgts. Christopher and Patricia Ford, following a ceremony in 2016. April is designated the month of the Military Child to highlight the daily sacrifices they make while their loved ones are serving. (Photo courtesy the Ford family)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- To be a military child has many meanings. For me, it means two loving parents who love their jobs, countless relatives telling me stories about their service in different branches and the dreadful road trip to a new home.

To start off, I must say I am very proud of my two loving parents who love their jobs-Chief Master Sgts. Patricia and Christopher Ford. Unlike most children my age, I have been able to witness my parents’ success through fancy dinners, rooms full of smiling people receiving and giving congratulations, a wonderful after-party at home and plenty more. Although the food served at recognition ceremonies is outstanding, it does not compare to the happiness you feel when finding out your parent or parents have been rewarded for all their hard work.

Every time I visit my mom’s side of the family, I hear great stories about my aunts and uncles’ service in the military. Hearing their stories is moving-it really opens your eyes.

Even though I love seeing new places, experiencing new food, meeting new people and becoming a part of the community, I am not a big fan of moving.  Unlike most of my friends and family, I am not really from anywhere. Since I move every three to four years, with the exception of Portugal and Colorado, I’ve been many places.  It is nice to meet new people, but it is also sad saying goodbye to people you’ve known for years and knowing you’ll most likely lose touch with many of them.

All in all, if I were asked what it is like to be a military child, I would say it comes with many challenges. It also has many great outcomes, such as meeting new people and creating new families. Home is not a house, but four crazy siblings and two amazing, hardworking parents.