Why I wear the uniform

Airman First Class Erin Eads, 50th Security Force Squadron. (Courtesty Photo)

Airman First Class Erin Eads, 50th Security Force Squadron. (Courtesty Photo)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

Nick Vujicic once said “The greatest rewards come when you give of yourself. It’s about bettering the lives of others, being part of something bigger than yourself, and making a positive difference.” When I first signed my name on the dotted line, the reasons as to why I wanted to be a part of the military were the same as anyone else. I wanted the chance to finish my education without adding on more student debt. I wanted to travel and see parts of the world that I know I wouldn’t go exploring on my own. I wanted to start a meaningful career and leave behind the jobs that weren’t taking me anywhere in life. Those reasons were enough motivation to carry me halfway through BMT but approaching graduation, I realized that signing my name on the dotted line was a commitment that was greater than I anticipated.

A commitment that sparked a fire in me that I didn’t know I had, I quickly become passionate about representing the decision I made. Suddenly, I noticed that being a part of the military was bigger than the reasons I came in for. It was bigger than me. I had a duty --- to defend my nation in its toughest times, in its simple times, and in its most devastating times. I could no longer be the selfish person that I was before because now the lives of hundreds and hundreds of others was on my hands and that’s something I had to pay attention to. Something I wanted to pay attention to. I knew from that day forward that the outlook I had before had to change and the feeling it brought me came easier than I guessed.

When I started technical school for Security Forces, the new feeling I had developed only seemed to intensify. I was having to prove myself, prove the ability I had to learn my job, prove the ability to maintain the military barring that was embedded into my mind the last two months, prove the ability that I was strong enough to become a cop within the military and to protect, defend, and fight against those who dared to cause harm on the nation. I wear the uniform to show that I am stronger than I ever thought I could be, that I am capable of achieving anything I set my mind to, to show that I am ready to take on any challenges that come my way, to show that I am prepared to defend those who can’t defend themselves, and that I’m proud to be a part of something that ultimately shaped me into the person that I am today.