#IamSCHRIEVER Portraits

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Chief Master Sgt. John Bentivegna, 50th Space Wing command chief, encourages Airmen at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, to ride safely and take advantage of the free motorcycle safety courses. The Air Force requires its motorcyclists to receive an initial motorcycle safety course followed by a refresher course once every five years. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos-Reyes) Command chief encourages Airmen to ride safely
Schriever Air Force Base's command chief is not new to motorcycles. In fact, he has been riding since his senior year of high school--in 1990.
0 4/19
2016
Erik Straus, 4th Space Operations Squadron Programs and Plans chief, has utilized the benefits provided by his Air Force service to check numerous items off his bucket list. In addition to traveling to all parts of the world, he used his GI Bill benefits to attend culinary school and earned his certification, making him a chef. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Brian Hagberg) I am SCHRIEVER: From cop to chef
People who are skilled in multiple areas of expertise are often referred to as a "jack of all trades." For the 4th Space Operations Squadron, the resident jack of all trades is Erik Straus."If you don't know where to go to get something done or how to do something, you should probably come and ask me," said Straus. "I've been associated with 4
0 4/05
2016
Col. DeAnna Burt, 50 SW commander, is responsible for more than 4,200 military, Department of Defense civilians and contractor personnel serving at 14 operating locations worldwide, in support of 175 communications, navigation and surveillance satellites with their associated systems valued at more than $66 billion. (U.S. Air Force photo/Dennis Rogers) 50 SW highlights Women's History Month
March is an ideal time to pause, reflect on all of the women in our lives and recognize their contributions. March is Women's History Month, and this year's theme is "Working to form a more perfect union: Honoring women in public service and government."To celebrate, the 50th Space Wing would like to highlight some of the women who help accomplish
0 3/23
2016
First Lt. Heather Nelson, an Air Force Tactical Exploitation of National Capabilities project engineer, volunteers as one of the Green Dot project coordinators at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Advocacy is not new to Nelson. She was part of Athlete Ally, a nonprofit organization designed to provide public awareness campaigns, educational programming and tools and resources to foster inclusive sports communities. (U.S. Air Force graphics/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes) I am SCHRIEVER: Changing one person at a time
First Lt. Heather Nelson would love to live in a world free of assault and violence. But in today's society, that appears to be quite an undertaking. For now, she wants to do it one step at a time; one person at a time."If we can change just one person's future, stop one future assault or prevent one person from experiencing violence in their life,
0 3/23
2016
Morris Thomas, 50th Space Wing Safety Office staff sergeant, says wrestling saved him from becoming self-destructive as a child. Now, he’s created the Children of Valor wrestling club at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, and hopes to pass on his lessons learned to the children. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Debbie Lockhart) I am SCHRIEVER: Wrestling saved me from myself
After moving from project housing to a higher income city when he was 9 years old, Morris Thomas, 50th Space Wing Safety Office staff sergeant, started a new school and was thrown into a world of discrimination and prejudice."I was made fun of a lot for either being poor or being black," said Thomas. "I was told I 'didn't belong there'; I 'looked
0 3/09
2016
Army Sgt. 1st Class Zenovia Weaver interns at THE 50th Logistics Readiness Flight at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, as part of Operation Warfighter, an unpaid federal internship program for recovering service members who are wounded, ill or injured and are assigned to a service’s Wounded Warrior Program. The purpose of the program is for the service members to network and gain work experience in a career field they wish to pursue after the military. (U.S. Air Force illustration/Tech. Sgt. Julius Delos Reyes) I am SCHRIEVER: Serving my country
For more than 19 years, she devoted her life to her country. Now, she is at a passage of uncertainty. Army Sgt. 1st Class Zenovia Weaver is navigating through the ambiguity of returning back to civilian life."Closing that chapter of my military career, it is bittersweet," the Soldier said. "It is bitter because I didn't get to make it to 20 years.
0 3/01
2016
Schriever Air Force Base personnel are advised to use caution during one of their routine tasks – fueling their vehicles. By being mindful of your actions at the gas station, you can avoid dangerous situations and potentially save lives. (Courtesy photo) Protect yourself at the pump
Almost everyone employed at Schriever needs one thing.  It is almost as vital as air or water; without it, we could be in real trouble.  Most people only think about it once a week or so.  What could it be?Fuel.If you drive, you will absolutely need fuel at some point.  Whether it is gasoline, diesel or electricity, a car will not propel itself
0 3/01
2016
First Lt. Kayla Marti, 2nd Space Operations Squadron mission commander, sidekicks through 4 inches of boards during the board-breaking portion of her second-degree black belt testing, Dec. 5, 2015, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Marti trains in Chung Do Kwan style, a subset of Tae Kwon Do, and has been practicing the art for more than 20 years. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/2nd Lt. Darren Domingo) I am SCHRIEVER: Attaining balance through discipline
(Editor's Note: "I am SCHRIEVER" is a diversity campaign dedicated to recognizing the diversity within our base as well as highlighting the way this diversity makes us stronger and better able to ensure mission success.)The idea of self-control and discipline has been thought about and practiced since ancient times. For Airmen, many may remember
0 2/19
2016
While it’s easy to take the benefits provided by GPS for granted, there was a time when timing, navigation and positioning were far less precise and hardly reliable. Let’s look back through history to some people and moments when GPS could have come in handy. (U.S. Air Force graphic) How GPS could have changed history
January marked the 25th anniversary of Operation Desert Storm, a campaign remembered for a variety of reasons, not the least of which that it marked the first time U.S. military forces used the Global Positioning System in combat. Since then, GPS has grown to serve more than 3 billion users and touches virtually every aspect of life.While it's easy
0 2/16
2016
Peter Carey, Colorado Springs police chief, presents Sue Harris with a Citizen’s Award of Appreciation during a ceremony Jan. 13, 2016 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Harris, the wife of Tech. Sgt. Austin Harris, 50th Civil Engineer Squadron, earned the award due to her courageous actions in helping a Colorado Springs police officer apprehend a suspected bank robber. (Courtesy photo) I am SCHRIEVER: Civilian hero
Imagine sitting at your desk, it's a day just like any other day. Suddenly you see a man darting in and out of traffic. You wonder what he's doing and fear that he may get hit by a car when you see the police officer hot on his heels.The officer catches the man in your office parking lot and a struggle ensues. You can see the officer is having a
0 2/03
2016
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