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Denver Broncos running back visits Schriever

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Denver Broncos running back Phillip Lindsay renders Schriever Airmen and family members the Mile High salute at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, June 7, 2019. The Mile High salute was the signature touchdown celebration of Hall of Fame running back Terrell Davis. Davis said the celebration is a sign of respect for service men and women. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Whitely)

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Denver Broncos running back Phillip Lindsay holds a training rifle after completing a training scenario with Security Forces at Schriever Air Force Base, June 7, 2019. Defenders are trained to protect the bases from which we project power. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Whitely)

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Denver Broncos running back Phillip Lindsay sends a message to deployed military members via a military satellite communications system at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, June 7, 2019. The 4th Space Operations Squadron’s mission is to operate the Air Force’s protected and wideband military satellite communications systems. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Whitely)

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Denver Broncos running back Phillip Lindsay sends a command to a satellite at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, June 7, 2019. The 2nd Space Operations Squadron performs the command and control mission for the Global Positioning System that supports 4 billion users around the world.. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jonathan Whitely)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

Denver Broncos running back Phillip Lindsay visited Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, June 7, 2019, to learn about the base and show his support for men and women in the armed forces.

Lindsay visited the base fitness center and the dining facility to meet with fans and talk about his path to the NFL.

“Hard work is something you can’t run from,” he said. “You work hard or you don’t. Everybody wants something, but you will never get to something if you aren’t willing to work for it. It could take time – days, weeks, months or even years, but if you have the drive, it will almost certainly pay off. You just have to be patient.”

Lindsay also visited the 2nd, 4th and 22nd Space Operations Squadrons and the 50th Security Forces Squadron to learn how Team Schriever masters space and cyberspace operations.

“I’m grateful for our troops,” Lindsay said. “We would not have this beautiful country without them, and I definitely wouldn’t be able to play football. It means a lot for me to come out here, you guys put your life on the line for people like me, and I’m thankful.”

During his visit, Lindsay had the rare opportunity to send a command to a satellite, communicate with deployed assets via a military satellite communication system and train with Security Forces in a crisis response simulator.

Master Sgt. Robert Shaw, 2nd Space Operations Squadron Global Positioning System sustainment superintendent, was instrumental in making this visit happen.

“I’ve known him for more than 12 years, since I coached his football team when he was younger,” Shaw said. “Phil has always been supportive of the military. He’s always been interested in the uniform we wear and what it means. He’s always been supportive of the men and women who serve.”

Shaw also said Lindsay has consistently had a good work ethic.

“He’s always had the heart and the motivation,” Shaw said.  “He’s the kind of guy who will do whatever it takes to win.”

Lindsay encouraged people to keep a positive mindset.

“One of the great things about being a kid is having big dreams,” he said. “No one says you can’t achieve your goals. It’s important to keep those dreams, no matter how big they are, this is how I got to where I am.”

Shaw said Lindsay learned the importance of being a part of a team at a young age.

“One time when he was younger, he was complaining about his offensive line not blocking well enough,” Shaw said. “So, his dad told him he had to play on the line. Let’s just say he learned real fast no one member of a team is more important than another.”

Lindsay said he hopes to be remembered as more than an athlete.

“When it’s all said and done, I don’t want to be known as an NFL player,” he said. “I want to be known as the person my mom and dad raised me to be. I want to be known as a genuinely good person because in the end, we’re all just people. There’s not a huge difference between me and you.”

He also said he is hosting a football camp for kids in July.

“Being active in the community and giving back is important,” he said. “Making an impact is something bigger than just football.”