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Year of the Defender: 50th Security Force Squadron Reports, Analysis add to base security

Staff Sgt. Brittinie Alvarez, 50th Security Force Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of reports and analysis and Airman 1st Class Airiana Gomez, 50th SFS reports and analysis, stand outside of their facility at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, July 15, 2019. The reports and analysis offices vets all clearance checks, ensuring personnel gaining entry meet the necessary requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Staff Sgt. Brittinie Alvarez, 50th Security Force Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of reports and analysis and Airman 1st Class Airiana Gomez, 50th SFS reports and analysis, stand outside of their facility at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, July 15, 2019. The reports and analysis offices vets all clearance checks, ensuring personnel gaining entry meet the necessary requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The 50th Security Forces Squadron Reports and Analysis office are sentinels of Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, vetting all clearance checks and ensuring personnel gaining entry meet the necessary requirements.

Staff Sgt. Brittinie Alvarez, 50th Security Force Squadron reports and analysis noncommissioned officer in charge, said her office is an additional layer to base security and defense, ensuring members on and off-duty are safe.

“Our mission ties into national security,” she said. “The individuals we process tend to work some of the delicate missions on our base. It is important to process their information in a timely manner to ensure we are successful in our no-fail mission.”

As of last month, Alvarez’s office processed approximately 400 background checks.

“We don’t just deal with active duty, we work with reservists, contractors and civilians,” she said. “It is our responsibility to ensure everyone working on this base has a clean background.”

Alvarez said her office also efficiently processes all reports 50th SFS conducts with a thorough investigation.

“The reports we receive can be anything from vehicle or ticketed incidents, conducting clearance checks to someone who gives the wrong information,” she said. “We are the individuals double checking that information and receiving the police reports for the base.”

Master Sgt. Rocky Thompson, 50th SFS plans and programs superintendent, said reports and analysis is the focal point for the Security Forces Management Information System.

 “They maintain account records, review processes and suspenses, distribute traffic and accident reports and all other incidents, and are the primary point of contact for leadership in incidents involving base personnel,” he said.

According to Alvarez, her office’s mission affects the 50th Space Wing in terms of accountability and data collection.

 “The reports we elevate are going up to first sergeants and commanders to higher headquarters,” she said. “We also support local law enforcement and the Federal Bureau of Investigation by presenting background checks in a timely manner.”

Reports and analysis also keeps Defenders current on the training required within the respective sections working with 50th SFS training and operations sections to avoid scheduling conflicts.

“We introduce new materials to enhance their capabilities on patrol,” Alvarez said. “For instance, if there is a new form, we update them so they can do their job effectively.”

Alvarez said one aspect of her mission she enjoys is police services because her office doesn’t frequently get to see the impact of their work.

“With police services we do get to go out and interact with children and make sure people are being safe. I enjoy doing that,” she said. “We have the ice cream patrol, where we give tickets that count toward earning an ice cream, to our patrolmen for when they are around the housing area. For instance, if they see a childwearing a helmet while they are on their bike or skateboard, they can reward them.”

Alvarez added the interactions reward good behavior while familiarizing themselves with children on base.

“They will see one child get an ice cream ticket and go grab their helmets so they can get an ice cream ticket, too,” she said. “It’s positive reinforcement, community involvement and an initiative we are working in partnership with the Tierra Vista community to encourage children to come up and talk to Defenders.”

Alvarez said there is a lot more to the individuals wearing the navy blue beret than people think.

“People may see us at the gate and think our whole life is checking ID card, when in reality we have situations where are interacting with the community and making sure people are safe, and we are safe responding to situations,” she said.

This article is the eighth part of a series highlighting the 50th Security Forces Squadron flights. See future issues of the Schriever Sentinel for more coverage of Year of the Defender.