#IamSCHRIEVER Portraits

HomeNewsFeatures

Airman’s Council provides professional development

Senior Airman William Darmon, Airman’s Council president, observes slides during a meeting at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Wednesday, March 22, 2017.  Airman’s Council provides leadership and volunteer opportunities for Airmen to better themselves. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class William Tracy)

Senior Airman William Darmon, Airman’s Council president, observes slides during a meeting at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Airman’s Council provides leadership and volunteer opportunities for Airmen to better themselves. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class William Tracy)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.- --

So you’re a new Airman - the only junior Airman in your office - working in the restricted area. Stationed at the “little base on the prairie,” you may wonder how to move up and make connections outside the insulation of your office, and how to meet other junior Airmen just like you.

The Airman’s Council may be your solution!

A professional development organization, the Airman’s Council holds meetings at 3 p.m. the third Wednesday of every month.

“It’s nice to see other Airmen and not be the person hiding in the office all the time,” said Airman 1st Class Suzanne Hall, 50th Space Wing Legal Office and Airman’s Council secretary. “A lot of Airmen probably just go to lunch and go back to their office. The council helps you get more involved, not just on base, but with other Airmen.”

Hall, who works outside the RA in Building 210 and Airman’s council president Senior Airman William Darmon, 3rd Space Operations Squadron Tactician for weapons and tactics, who works inside the RA, demonstrate the dividing factor the RA may have on Schriever Airmen.

The Airman’s council helps bridge this gap, said Darmon.

“Through the Airman’s Council, I’ve met a lot of cool people, getting to know other missions better,” he said.  “One of my best friends on base is Airman Hall, and she works totally different aspects in the Air Force than I do. When you are in Airman’s Council, you get to meet new people, and you get to have fun.”

The Airmen’s Council also provides a wealth of opportunities for Airmen to step up and lead, helping with Enlisted Personnel Reports, said Darmon.

“We help develop Airmen through morale events, volunteer events and give them an opportunity to lead. If you want to just be part of something, that’s fine, it still helps,” said Darmon.  “But if you want to lead, we can help mentor and encourage you, and have other mentors who will help as well.” 

Other mentors include senior leaders and counselors, such as first sergeants and chaplains, who regularly attend meetings. They impart knowledge and provide morale and professional development support for Airmen, teaching how to speak in front of an audience (necessary to be promoted below-the-zone), how to enhance morale in their individual units and other leadership qualities.

“We want to help raise Airmen to the next level,” said Darmon. “For example, if we have Airmen who say ‘We want to get BTZ, what resources are there for it?’ The Airman’s Council will get a couple NCOs and Senior NCOs for advice.”

The combined input and guidance from experienced leaders and like-minded junior Airmen, as well as gaining leadership opportunities and other benefits, makes the Airman’s Council a valuable resource for any junior Airman wishing to make an impact outside the office, said Hall.

“It’s important for Airmen to have an outlet, not just NCOs or senior NCOs,” said Hall. “It’s important for them to realize they have other Airmen they can go to, and that’s important for the Airman’s Council.”

For more information about the Airman’s Council and its benefits, contact Hall at 567-5061.

Feature Search