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Life experience will offer a child a loving home

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The Joint Military Adoption Workshop sponsored by the local area Airman & Family Readiness Centers, is held annually to inform prospective parents about foster care and adoption resources available. For information on adoption one source is www.childwelfare.gov which includes details for military families or call the Schriever Airman and Family Readiness Center at 567-3920. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stacy D. Foster)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - The Joint Military Adoption Workshop sponsored by the local area Airman & Family Readiness Centers, is held annually to inform prospective parents about foster care and adoption resources available. For information on adoption one source is www.childwelfare.gov which includes details for military families or call the Schriever Airman and Family Readiness Center at 567-3920. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stacy D. Foster)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- Imagine as a child never owning a pair of new shoes, having a toy to play with or having a birthday cake. For some, this may conjure up images of a child living in a third world country. Unfortunately, that isn't always the case. 

"My sister and I were in foster care since I was two and she was a newborn. We lived in 30 foster homes before being adopted," said Geneva Morse. "So I have the insiders view from being a foster child. I can understand what they've been through as a foster child -- feeling unloved and unwanted." 

Mrs. Morse and her husband Senior Airman Matt Morse, 1st Space Operations Squadron, recently attended the Joint Military Adoption Workshop sponsored by the local area Airman & Family Readiness Centers, to find out about foster care and adoption resources available. 

Because of her life experience, Mrs. Morse wants to make a positive difference in children's lives. 

"This was the first step beyond searching the internet for information," said Airman Morse. "My wife has done extensive internet research on adoption, but as for me this was my first opportunity to discuss the requirements with professionals on the subject." 

Mrs. Morse was 11 and her sister nine, when they were finally adopted by one of the foster care families. 

"My sister and I were adopted together, but they didn't adopt my brother because he had ADHD and they didn't think they could handle him. To this day I don't know where my brother is," said Mrs. Morse. 

She said she wants the child or children they adopt to know without a doubt they have a loving home with parents who will always care for them no matter what. 

Although many potential adopting families want newborns or very young children the Morse's are interested in adopting older children.
 
"We want to adopt older kids -- they might have more issues, but it's never too late to give a child a loving home," she said. 

The adoption workshop provided information to more than 40 hopeful parents. The topics included specific information to military families, resources and referrals, interstate adoptions, local and infant adoption, international adoptions in addition to an adoptive parent forum and testimonials. 

"The information given by the many agencies there did inspire us to proceed with the adoption process," said Airman Morse. "We believe we may have found the right adoption agency for us, our next step is to attend the orientation class offered by the agency we chose. We are preparing to move to a bigger home more suited for a family and start the home study portion to move forward in the process." 

"I was looking at an adoption Web site and all this little girl wanted for Christmas was a Mom and Dad," said Mrs. Morse. "It just melts your heart."

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